Posts Tagged ‘interview

15
Apr
12

akihiro ueda a.k.a. akhr1961:: nocturnal city-scapes


A selection of photos by Akihiro Ueda a.k.a. akhr1961



signal

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signal (2012)


lotus

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lotus (2011)


each of light, each of life

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each of light, each of life (2012)


get home

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get home (2010)


slit

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slit (2010)


1

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1 (2012)


illumination

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illumination (2010)



– How would you describe this set of images?
– This selection of photos is the scenery of ordinary night. Landscape by devising a perspective will produce extraordinary visual effects.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– I’m an architect. Day-to-day I observe architecture and urban environments as a landscape rather than a stand-alone architecture. I’m interested in visual spaces that are generated by textures of various materials, light and shadow, and reflections.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I like to capture common scenes of daily life (street life in particular).


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I like to take pictures of daily life by changing the point of view. I am very happy there is a new discovery and inspirations.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– I usually take pictures on the way to work. Never take the time to take a photo. There may be a dream location if there is no time constraint.


– What is you favourite camera?
– I like to carry a compact camera, lightly everyday and anywhere. I have Ricoh R10.


– Have you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I expose on flickr. Recently, on Facebook I’m uploading easily daily photos taken with iPhone.
Thank you.

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05
Apr
12

ximo michavila :: abstracted architectural visions


A selection of photos by Ximo Michavila



Architecture 9

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Architecture #9 (2007)
Centro Galego de Arte Contemporaneo. Alvaro Siza


Architecture 1

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Architecture #1 (2011)
Art center. College of design. Daly Genik architects. Pasadena


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Architecture #13 (2007)
Art center. College of design. Daly Genik architects. Pasadena


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Architecture #45 (2012)
Art center. College of design. Daly Genik architects. Pasadena


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Architecture #47 (2012)
Centro Galego de Arte Contemporaneo. Alvaro Siza


Architecture #43

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Architecture #43 (2012)
Lowell health house. Richard Neutra. Los Angeles


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Architecture #11 (2007)
Centro Galego de Arte Contemporaneo. Alvaro Siza



– Hello, Ximo. How would you describe this set of images?
– Architects and planners are the true creators of all that surrounds us in an urban environment. I took advantage of them, of their works, seeking abstraction, trying to extract small parts of it to create another work, this time in two dimensions. Almost unconsciously the shape turns into the main figure over all looking for a geometric world where the concept of architectural work disappears. I often wonder if in architecture photography it’s not about taking pictures with the camera but cutting up a building with a pair of scissors.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture?
What attracts your visual attention?
– I don’t know if architects are aware of all the views that a building can provide in different light conditions. That is my function when I’m in front of a building, finding edges, corners, shadows, reflections and using them to create a particular vision out of context. The geometry of lines and surfaces are for me the main reason to shoot.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I like the abstraction of flowers, their colors and shapes. Landscape is also a theme that appeals to me. I like it very simple and clean; form dominating over matter. Macro photography is a technique that I like but applied to the combination of elements symbolizing a conceptual idea. It’s fun to go for a walk or visit any place to search for objects, movements, corners, etc. that are plastically interesting.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– Photography is my hobby. I shoot for fun without any kind of professional or documentary condition. I love to find the frame that I like or something that catches my attention. My goal when shooting or when I do the post-production process is that people see my pictures; just as I like to see works by other photographers, analyzing their techniques and enjoying the beauty. The Red Square Gallery is an example of a great opportunity to show my photos and try to make people enjoy them.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– Any place where you can find works of modern architecture would be a good place to spend several hours shooting. The fun would be directly proportional to the size and complexity of the work. An example of a city where I would do several photo shoots is Brasilia, where you can find amazing masterpieces of architecture with great photographic beauty.


– What is your favorite camera?
– I have a Canon EOS 5D Mark II, but I´m always looking at technological news, so my opinion may change in future.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I expose on Flickr usually, and some of my photos were selected in Archidose and Archdaily blogs:
archidose.blogspot.com.es/2011/05/
archidose.blogspot.com.es/2012/02/
archdaily.com/207251/ad-round-up-best-from-flickr/
www.archdaily.com/222065/ad-round-up-best-from-flickr/
Exhibitions:
“The modern housing in Valencia region” 2007 in Architects’ association of Valencia
“The modern housing in Spain” 2009 in DOCOMOMO
Books:
“Juan Jose Estellés Ceba. Architect”. Maite Palomares & Carlos Meri. 2007. Architects’ association of Valencia.
Magazines:
On diseño 2008, “America’s Cup special”
En blanco, 2011, Cultural buildings special “Maxxi museum in Rome by Zaha Hadid”
Collaborator:
Democracia, Art work team.


– Thanks for letting me present a selection of your photos in the gallery and for the interview. Best wishes for your photographic work.

25
Mar
12

alan wilson a.k.a. azurebumble :: dalhousie building series


A selection of photos by Alan Wilson a.k.a. AZUREBUMBLE featuring Dalhousie building from Dundee University (Scotland)



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Dalhousie Building 8 (2012)



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Dalhousie Building 7 (2012)



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Dalhousie Building 6 (2012)



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Dalhousie Building 5 (2012)



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Dalhousie Building 3 (2012)



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Dalhousie Building 2 (2012)



– Hello, Alan. How would you describe this set of images?
– These images are monumental and minimal, concerning form, light and colour…


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– It can be anything really…a shape, a shadow, a form, a rhythm, a pattern, a sign, a fragment, a reflection, a juxstaposition…they’re all important and alluring in their own way.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– Lately I’ve been looking at a lot of black and white ‘street photography’ and I’m particularly drawn to the work of Lee Friedlander… I like the ambiguity, how the ‘real’ and ‘reflected’ worlds overlap and fragment, where vision/perception is questioned or becomes momentarily confused.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I’m an incredibly lazy photographer! However in my defence, I do view a large amount of photographic works on the internet each day. Therefore I would tentatively suggest that a lot can be learnt via the process of ‘osmosis’… where by routinely consuming visual material one can gradually refine ones aesthetic sensibliity (although perhaps not technical ability!)


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– New York or Tokyo


– What is you favourite camera?
– The human mind / memory …


– Have you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I have published some works in Y SIN EMBARGO magazine by fernandoprats and in your very own Shadé books. Series of my work and others can be found on my blog Aesthetic Investigations and Tumblr. I previously published the photo book Hypo-X-Series – A Digital Curation in collaboration with Flickr Photographers. I’m currently finishing off a book of curated series from my Aesthetic investigations blog. I also have a book of graphic works called Fragmental.


– Thank you for giving me an opportunity to present a selection of your previously unpublished works and for the interview. I wish you all the best with your work.

15
Mar
12

augusto rosa : asphalt stories


A selection of photos by Augusto Rosa



to belong

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to belong (2008)


wednesday

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wednesday (2009)


rehab

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rehab (2008)


everything passes....

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everything passes (2009)


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untitled (2009)


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untitled (2008)


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untitled (2008)



– Hello, Augusto. How would you describe this set of images?
– I do take pictures of everything but, I’m an “asphalt” addict and this set represents my urge to find perspective, form, geometry and philosophy through lines juxtaposed over black surfaces. This set surprised me somehow, because it is my second exhibition with the same subject, and all the images are “originals” with regard to the first one, which means I’m still trying to see the wonky lines, the fragile assertions and to seek the vanishing point of my asphalt travels. I still feel that there are thousands of miles to click still…


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What attracts your visual attention?
– I’m always fascinated by the other meaning of the man made environment and objects. As a practicing architect for 28 years, when I grab my camera I always look for the “antagonistic”, the anti-pragmatism of the composition, the shape, the geometry. My eye is looking for the abstract and poetic side of the urban jungle, the meaning of the small detail, the forgotten corner the other “façade” of a façade.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I like everything, but I’m specially drawn to minimal and realistic abstractions and also building a sort of philosophical visual (philosophoto) journey with my work.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I’m a visual being. I like to paint and draw too, but in 2007 when I started playing with photography, I was hooked instantly, it is my favorite media this days. I do not plan a lot of my shots and the thrill of the instant idea, the click and later the editing gives me the adrenaline I don’t get with other visual experiments. My goal is to keep challenging myself; like I’m almost afraid that an image is going to lose its meaning if I do not go through the whole process as quickly as I can.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I don’t. I think any location, anywhere is always a challenge and you can get the most of it if you are ready for it, but I have to say that NYC and Barcelona are my favorite city “models”.


– What is your favorite camera?
– I have a Nikon D7000, a Cannon RebelX and a small collection of Panasonic Lumixes. The Lumixes are great small cameras and I always have one with me – they sleep on my night table.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– My work is in a couple of issues of the Y sin Embargo magazine, and in the photo-books Hypo-X-series by Azurbumble (Alan Wilson) and Shadé by Brancolina. I published two books on Blurb: “Life Without Parole” and “A4 Architects“ and I have my photos as covers to several books: “Cronicas” (National Peace Awards of Colombia) by Marta Ruiz Editora and “Redalu”, a sociological study published by the Universitat de Barcelona. I also have some photos (architecture) published in “Portland Magazine” from Maine. All of my work is on Flickr

24
Feb
12

wilma eras a.k.a. w.eras :: urban scenes painted by shadows


A selection of photos by Wilma Eras a.k.a. w.eras



Light in the city 4

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Light in the city 4 (2011)



Lightscape 9

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Lightscape 9 (2011)



Corner 1

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Corner 1 (2010)



Concrete beauty 1

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Concrete beauty 1 (2011)



Urban reflections 5

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Urban reflections 5 (2011)



Squares

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Squares (2011)



Acrobat

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Acrobat (2011)



– Hello, Wilma. Welcome to the gallery. How would you describe this set of images?
– They are all about light. In the first four images I used light to reveal the beauty of concrete surfaces. The windows series shows another aspect of light: the power to connect the interior to the exterior world. As for the last one, I simply loved to see the acrobat.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Urban environments offer me the possibility to explore my own sense of space. In doing so, light always triggers me. A Flickr friend once called me a sunflower. I think he is right. I’m fascinated by the way light is able to change the geometry of a certain space, which looks different one minute to the next, offering new geometric shapes all over again.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I love to make ‘paperstracts’. When I look through my macro lens, a new world opens for me. It’s exciting to discover landscapes or human shapes in a piece of paper.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– My photography reflects the way I experience the urban environment around me. I do not have a very good sense of orientation. I tend to see details rather than the complete street map of a city, which can be tricky because time changes most details. Besides that, the more I investigate a certain place, the more I have the feeling to look at what is beyond it. That is also the reality that I want to share.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– I guess I could work everywhere, but it’s always nice to explore new spaces. For instance, I would really like to visit the MAXXI in Rome.


– What is you favourite camera?
– I mostly work with a Nikon D90. Recently I also got a nice compact Lumix camera.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– Besides Flickr, I have published some works in Y SIN EMBARGO magazine by Fernando Prats (click here to find links to all issues where I contributed) and in collective photo books Haphazart!2, Shadé and Shadé II. Selections of my photos are presented on Azurebumble’s weblog Aesthetic Investigations in posts Wilma Eras: paperstracts and Wilma Eras: photography. I have recently published the photo book Fragments in collaboration with mengwen29 (Françoise Lucas), to preview click here.


– Thanks, Wilma. Best wishes for your photography and congratulations on the photo book.

14
Feb
12

crosslens :: urban minimalism


A selection of photos by crosslens



red concrete example

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red concrete example (2011)


waiting zone

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waiting zone (2009)


room with view

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room with view (2010)


displacement

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displacement (2009)


castle lines

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castle lines (2011)


emergency  exit

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emergency exit (2010)


toilet paper alarm

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toilet paper alarm (2011)



– Hello Ralf. How would you describe this set of images?
– My first intention was: oh, a lot of red squares and rectangles – Red square gallery, the name says it all. On the second view I made an interesting discovery: when I made these photos it was not the red that attracted my attention but the play of the lines, the space and the dots in these photos. The red was an add-on that caused the balance weight of the composition. With another color I’m sure I would have composed and balanced some of these photos in another way. It’s a feeling that I cannot describe with rules: when I see a motif and I want to convey it in the 2:3-Format of my camera I try to find a balance that is formed by structures and colors. Each of these elements has his own weight that will balance the scale.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– I think my urban environments and architecture are often stringently geometric. I love the precise and straight lines and the (a)symmetry of modern architecture– and the break of these lines and (a)symmetry. It reminds me an excursion to a city in Germany that is famous for its old buildings from the 14th century. I entered the inner city, saw all these old buckled and crooked buildings and my first question was: and where is here the quarter with modern architecture?

What attracts my attention? Lines, lines and lines – and the interaction of these lines that can make geometric structures. Light, light and light – and the interaction of the light that makes shadows and colors.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I love modern architecture, but I also love the nature and sometimes I spend weeks in the middle of nowhere surrounded by woods, lakes and grassland. I take hundreds of photos just from the trees, the light on the trees, between the trees, from the landscapes and the clouds, the plants and the meadows.
In the city I find my nature in the botanical garden where I can pass hours lying on the floor and making macro photos of colorful plants. I replace the strict large geometry of the architecture with the liberty of forms of small flowers. Not to forget: I love minimalism, the reduction of things to nearly nothing.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– The beginning was a great mistake: I’m a programmer and I wanted to leave the monitor and to go out. But digital photography calls for coming back to “develop” these photos – and I’ve to pass again a good dose of time in front of a Monitor. I try to find and to photograph the nature of the things, the nature of my motif. I want to achieve that the beholder finds out that beauty can be everywhere, in the small as in the large, in the things made by humans as in the things made by the nature. Sometimes it depends just on the point of view.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– There are surely some places where the concentration of structures that I like is very, very high. But as a binge can have enough painful side-effects I prefer to discover a location for a long time. As I learned here in Hamburg that I can still discover new motifs, the dream location is where I am in the moment I’m making the photo.


– What is your favorite camera?
– The camera that I’m able to adjust. It’s not the camera which makes the photo – it’s the photographer. I know what I want to catch how and I just need a camera that can do that and the knowledge how I can do that with this camera. But I’ve some favorite lenses: my macro and my wide angle.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I’ve never published any photo books, I’m too lazy. It would mean that I’ve to pass again more time in front of a monitor after my work and the developing of my photos. I’ve my own photo-website that I didn’t update since years and I’m the webmaster of a photo group where some of my photos are posted. Flickr that is like my diary for photography. It’s quick an easy. But I’ve to say that I’m not a “good” community member – because it would cause that I pass again more time in front of a computer.


– Thank you very much, Ralf.

04
Feb
12

John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64 :: harmonics of space


A selection of photos by John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64


conversationwhitewallsq

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conversationwhitewallsq (2012)


treewallsq

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treewallsq (2007)


wharfropesq

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wharfropesq (2008)


dm4jcsq

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dm4jcsq (2008)


lineshadowsq

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lineshadowsq (2010)


multistoreysq

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multistoreysq (2007)



– Hello John. How would you describe this set of images?
– This is a very interesting selection of my photos. Firstly, all are film based, and all represent a moment in time, where there is alignment either by accident or observation (e.g. moving two steps to the left), all are about harmonics of space. I dislike the 35mm format of 3 to 2, it is not harmonic, neither are 5×4 or 10×8. I was strongly influenced early on by a book “Elements of dynamic symmetry” a Dover Publication, and later by a book on Islamic pattern by Keith Critchlow. These books and similar are not in the forefront of my mind whilst taking photographs, nor do I apply any rigid theory. However, working within a square and breaking elements down into harmonic proportions along with time and space is at the root of these photographs.

What is quite concerning to me is how difficult the transition has been from film to digital. I can remember going out with just 12 shots on 120 and the concentration that was needed to make intelligent decisions and to be able to walk away from what you knew was an average situation. I have long since dismantled my darkroom, it was the correct decision, but, oh my, this digital world is proving to be a challenge. There is no need to edit or walk away, this in turn can lead to sloppiness of thinking and the power of chance.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Architects do not make me smile, having said that things appear to be getting marginally better. Buildings are dormant, it is the moment of time, even the passing of time, the colour of the day, the movement of people and the alignment of things that are the observation. Photography is the need to recognise these things with others. We all see the same things, it is just that photographers have the need to store and record it.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I don’t know about styles, but I do have favourite photographers that I refer back to. I am also influenced by painters and often a very varied collection of them lurk around the back of my head whilst taking pics. There’s Rothko for sure, also Howard Hodgkin, Francis Bacon, Lucien Freud, Malevich, Kandinski, Nicholson … too many, even Annigoni. Photographers are referred to for their skills and technique as much as their insight, and their relationship with the time they each lived in. So Roger Fenton in the Crimea , Atget in France, Steichen, Moholy-Nagy, Brandt, the wit Lee Friedlander, Irving Penn, Salgado, even Snowdon having grown up with The Sunday Times colour supplement, and for sheer technique, Karsh and that 14inch Ektar. If this plants me with my head firmly looking back over my shoulder then so be it.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I take photographs every day. My goal is to have a full and rewarding day. Results are important, but only as an outcome of keeping my eyes open and trying not to respond in the same predictable ways, which is the thing I can be most guilty of. Thankfully I am beyond the screeching ego of youth and the pragmatism of middle age, I am now trying to find the courage to behave as fearlessly as Goya portrayed in his late manic etchings, I am that fearless or capable.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– Not a dream location as such, but I do have a dream to work with a writer or poet in the same way that Fay Godwin produced photographs for the book “Remains of Elmet” illustrating and reflecting the poetry of Ted Hughes, or explore the poetry of John Clare and the countryside of Northamptonshire where I live albeit two hundred years later.


– What is your favorite camera?
– My favourite camera was and still is the Rolleiflex. I like the viewfinder, the optics and the quietness of operation. I have owned two of them firstly a 3.5f with a planar lens and then a2.8f with planar as a replacement. This was a mistake , I should have kept both of them. Although the difference between 75mm and 80mm does not seem a great deal, in practice it proved enormous. The 75mm 3,5f Rollei was wonderful for landscape with an openness of vista that the 80mm 2.8f could not capture. On the other hand the 2,8f was the superior studio and portrait camera. My first camera was an Olympus OM1, I still have it but do not use it now and I would never want to part with it. Truth is my real passion is for lenses, especially English ones. I now have a Canon 5d mk2 and a Sony Nex5n, neither of which I feel much affection for, but they do the job of capturing the images made by my old lenses.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I have no books or other visibility on the internet other than Flickr. One cannot argue with the feedback from Flickr , it is what it is. It is high art, it is low art , it is multi- cultural and North South East and West . It is so broad that the thought “every one is out of step except me” is not a consideration.


-Thank you very much, it’s been a pleasure meeting you.