Archive Page 2

14
Feb
12

crosslens :: urban minimalism


A selection of photos by crosslens



red concrete example

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red concrete example (2011)


waiting zone

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waiting zone (2009)


room with view

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room with view (2010)


displacement

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displacement (2009)


castle lines

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castle lines (2011)


emergency  exit

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emergency exit (2010)


toilet paper alarm

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toilet paper alarm (2011)



– Hello Ralf. How would you describe this set of images?
– My first intention was: oh, a lot of red squares and rectangles – Red square gallery, the name says it all. On the second view I made an interesting discovery: when I made these photos it was not the red that attracted my attention but the play of the lines, the space and the dots in these photos. The red was an add-on that caused the balance weight of the composition. With another color I’m sure I would have composed and balanced some of these photos in another way. It’s a feeling that I cannot describe with rules: when I see a motif and I want to convey it in the 2:3-Format of my camera I try to find a balance that is formed by structures and colors. Each of these elements has his own weight that will balance the scale.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– I think my urban environments and architecture are often stringently geometric. I love the precise and straight lines and the (a)symmetry of modern architecture– and the break of these lines and (a)symmetry. It reminds me an excursion to a city in Germany that is famous for its old buildings from the 14th century. I entered the inner city, saw all these old buckled and crooked buildings and my first question was: and where is here the quarter with modern architecture?

What attracts my attention? Lines, lines and lines – and the interaction of these lines that can make geometric structures. Light, light and light – and the interaction of the light that makes shadows and colors.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I love modern architecture, but I also love the nature and sometimes I spend weeks in the middle of nowhere surrounded by woods, lakes and grassland. I take hundreds of photos just from the trees, the light on the trees, between the trees, from the landscapes and the clouds, the plants and the meadows.
In the city I find my nature in the botanical garden where I can pass hours lying on the floor and making macro photos of colorful plants. I replace the strict large geometry of the architecture with the liberty of forms of small flowers. Not to forget: I love minimalism, the reduction of things to nearly nothing.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– The beginning was a great mistake: I’m a programmer and I wanted to leave the monitor and to go out. But digital photography calls for coming back to “develop” these photos – and I’ve to pass again a good dose of time in front of a Monitor. I try to find and to photograph the nature of the things, the nature of my motif. I want to achieve that the beholder finds out that beauty can be everywhere, in the small as in the large, in the things made by humans as in the things made by the nature. Sometimes it depends just on the point of view.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– There are surely some places where the concentration of structures that I like is very, very high. But as a binge can have enough painful side-effects I prefer to discover a location for a long time. As I learned here in Hamburg that I can still discover new motifs, the dream location is where I am in the moment I’m making the photo.


– What is your favorite camera?
– The camera that I’m able to adjust. It’s not the camera which makes the photo – it’s the photographer. I know what I want to catch how and I just need a camera that can do that and the knowledge how I can do that with this camera. But I’ve some favorite lenses: my macro and my wide angle.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I’ve never published any photo books, I’m too lazy. It would mean that I’ve to pass again more time in front of a monitor after my work and the developing of my photos. I’ve my own photo-website that I didn’t update since years and I’m the webmaster of a photo group where some of my photos are posted. Flickr that is like my diary for photography. It’s quick an easy. But I’ve to say that I’m not a “good” community member – because it would cause that I pass again more time in front of a computer.


– Thank you very much, Ralf.

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04
Feb
12

John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64 :: harmonics of space


A selection of photos by John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64


conversationwhitewallsq

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conversationwhitewallsq (2012)


treewallsq

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treewallsq (2007)


wharfropesq

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wharfropesq (2008)


dm4jcsq

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dm4jcsq (2008)


lineshadowsq

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lineshadowsq (2010)


multistoreysq

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multistoreysq (2007)



– Hello John. How would you describe this set of images?
– This is a very interesting selection of my photos. Firstly, all are film based, and all represent a moment in time, where there is alignment either by accident or observation (e.g. moving two steps to the left), all are about harmonics of space. I dislike the 35mm format of 3 to 2, it is not harmonic, neither are 5×4 or 10×8. I was strongly influenced early on by a book “Elements of dynamic symmetry” a Dover Publication, and later by a book on Islamic pattern by Keith Critchlow. These books and similar are not in the forefront of my mind whilst taking photographs, nor do I apply any rigid theory. However, working within a square and breaking elements down into harmonic proportions along with time and space is at the root of these photographs.

What is quite concerning to me is how difficult the transition has been from film to digital. I can remember going out with just 12 shots on 120 and the concentration that was needed to make intelligent decisions and to be able to walk away from what you knew was an average situation. I have long since dismantled my darkroom, it was the correct decision, but, oh my, this digital world is proving to be a challenge. There is no need to edit or walk away, this in turn can lead to sloppiness of thinking and the power of chance.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Architects do not make me smile, having said that things appear to be getting marginally better. Buildings are dormant, it is the moment of time, even the passing of time, the colour of the day, the movement of people and the alignment of things that are the observation. Photography is the need to recognise these things with others. We all see the same things, it is just that photographers have the need to store and record it.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I don’t know about styles, but I do have favourite photographers that I refer back to. I am also influenced by painters and often a very varied collection of them lurk around the back of my head whilst taking pics. There’s Rothko for sure, also Howard Hodgkin, Francis Bacon, Lucien Freud, Malevich, Kandinski, Nicholson … too many, even Annigoni. Photographers are referred to for their skills and technique as much as their insight, and their relationship with the time they each lived in. So Roger Fenton in the Crimea , Atget in France, Steichen, Moholy-Nagy, Brandt, the wit Lee Friedlander, Irving Penn, Salgado, even Snowdon having grown up with The Sunday Times colour supplement, and for sheer technique, Karsh and that 14inch Ektar. If this plants me with my head firmly looking back over my shoulder then so be it.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I take photographs every day. My goal is to have a full and rewarding day. Results are important, but only as an outcome of keeping my eyes open and trying not to respond in the same predictable ways, which is the thing I can be most guilty of. Thankfully I am beyond the screeching ego of youth and the pragmatism of middle age, I am now trying to find the courage to behave as fearlessly as Goya portrayed in his late manic etchings, I am that fearless or capable.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– Not a dream location as such, but I do have a dream to work with a writer or poet in the same way that Fay Godwin produced photographs for the book “Remains of Elmet” illustrating and reflecting the poetry of Ted Hughes, or explore the poetry of John Clare and the countryside of Northamptonshire where I live albeit two hundred years later.


– What is your favorite camera?
– My favourite camera was and still is the Rolleiflex. I like the viewfinder, the optics and the quietness of operation. I have owned two of them firstly a 3.5f with a planar lens and then a2.8f with planar as a replacement. This was a mistake , I should have kept both of them. Although the difference between 75mm and 80mm does not seem a great deal, in practice it proved enormous. The 75mm 3,5f Rollei was wonderful for landscape with an openness of vista that the 80mm 2.8f could not capture. On the other hand the 2,8f was the superior studio and portrait camera. My first camera was an Olympus OM1, I still have it but do not use it now and I would never want to part with it. Truth is my real passion is for lenses, especially English ones. I now have a Canon 5d mk2 and a Sony Nex5n, neither of which I feel much affection for, but they do the job of capturing the images made by my old lenses.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I have no books or other visibility on the internet other than Flickr. One cannot argue with the feedback from Flickr , it is what it is. It is high art, it is low art , it is multi- cultural and North South East and West . It is so broad that the thought “every one is out of step except me” is not a consideration.


-Thank you very much, it’s been a pleasure meeting you.

24
Jan
12

attilio capra a.k.a. acph :: hidden poetry


A selection of photos by Attilio Capra a.k.a. acph



no train

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No train


circle

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circle


grid_green

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grid_green


red square and line

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red square and line


backstreet2

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backstreet2


lines and strips

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lines and strips



– Hi, Attilio. How would you describe this set of images?
– This selection of photos belongs to the project Hidden poetry. The urban environment is dissected by highlighting its poetical character, according to a compositional rigor of correspondences of lines and colors.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– I like to find the detail that suggest the total. The human landscape tells about the people more than the people themselves.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I am fascinated by the anthropological photography, because it can tell about people and places without the mannerism of journalism.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– Photography has always been my medium of expression, through it I tell myself who I am. Fortunately someone appreciates my work and buy my pictures.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? which city would you like to visit for a photo session? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I am attracted to all “non places”, I love the anonymous spaces, the suburb of the world.


– What is your favorite camera?
– The Leica M9, its compact size allows me to carry it always with me without sacrificing quality.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I’ve recently published the photo book Hidden poetry with Blurb. My works were published on several blogs and photographic sites (click here to view the list), my website is acph.viewbook.com and some of my projects are shown on Behance network.


– Thanks a lot, Attilio. All the best with your photography.

04
Dec
11

anna leporati serrao a.k.a. pannaphoto :: urban visions


A selection of photos by Anna Leporati Serrao a.k.a. pannaphotos



TO STEVE JOBS

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to steve jobs


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urban forestation


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il condominio spagnolo


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making the grades


crossed perspective

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crossed perspective


dead end street 2

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dead end street


– Hello, Anna. How would you describe this selection of photos?
– First of all I want to thank you for this kind invitation. All chosen images have been taken during some recent trips of mine around Europe. The first one, a tribute to the genius of Steve Jobs, is certainly my best-loved. I think this set shows, in a different way, my photographic approach to urban environment. To summarize, my love for strong contrasts of light, sometimes geometric shapes or incongruencies.

– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Urban environment is the stage where contemporary people spend most of their time. My aim is to photographically document the fragility, the loneliness, the uncertainty of humans in the relationship with their environment. Sometimes I like to break the composition rules in order to create a tension and something that is not so easy to visually read. Regarding architecture, it’s known that architects are nowadays considered “stars” and that all the photographers are terribly fascinated by their creations all over the world. I am visually attracted by geometry, shapes, lines, rhythms, contrasts, negative spaces, juxtapositions, ambiguities … which are the elements that all photographers so much love in this kind of subject.

– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– Abstractions, minimal works, sometimes portraits, I love the surreal world too … perhaps it’s easier for me to say what I don’t like, or better, what I’m not so good about: landscapes – up to now, of course. I hope to improve.

– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– Passion is the main motivation! I can’t spend a day without taking photographs or processing my shots, reading some books about photography, surfing on the internet or looking for exhibitions. I know it’s a kind of fixed idea, but I can’t help it. My goal is to create a perfect image and I’m going to continue looking for it.

– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I love to challenge my creative ability everywhere. Each place, with its own identity, can be inspiring but, at the top of my desire list, it’s Basel where there is a concentration of good museums and architectural beauties, especially Vitra Campus in Weil-am-Rhein. Besides It would be fantastic to return to some unforgettable towns especially Paris, Barcelona, New York, London, Valencia …

– What is your favorite camera?
– In the past I worked with 2 compact cameras, a Casio Exilim and a Canon Powershot G9. I now own a Nikon D90 with two lenses. If I buy a new camera I’ll choose a Canon 5d Mark II.

– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– Two years ago I published a book on Blurb Out of Focus, soon I’m going to make another one. Some of my works are on sale on Getty Images and in the past I took part in three collective exhibitions and I’ve been also the curator together with some friends. Recently I’ve joined Google+, but I’m still not so frequent there, so my photographs are mainly exposed on Flickr. Thank you again!

24
Nov
11

claudio alba a.k.a. simply1man :: urban visions


A selection of photos by Claudio Alba a.k.a. simply1man



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untitled


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untitled


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X_cross


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DSC03963


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QUARTIERE FIERISTIC


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il “Treno” (quartiere Barca) 1957-62 – Arch. Giuseppe Vaccaro


DSC02674 bw

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DSC02674 bw



– Hi, Claudio. How would you describe this set of images?
– I think this selection is highly representative of my approach to architectural photography: oblique camera angles and sequences of parallel planes. All highlighted by cuts of light and shadows.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– -I live in a city, Bologna, whose original medieval old town is a jewel of harmony. For my photographic work however, I am attracted to the outskirts of towns, which are chaotic and squalid. I love to seek and capture individual elements or perspectives that unveil an unobtrusive appearance or aestethic.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
-Photography of interiors: I am an interior designer and often use photography to document my work.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
-Like many amateur photographers who grew up on “chemical” photography, digital technology has rekindled a passion in me which was neglected due to a lack of time to devote in the darkroom. My intention is to turn my hobby into a business tied to to interior design publishing sector.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? which city would you like to visit for a photo session? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I particularly find Luis Barragan’s Mexican architectures very photogenic. For opposite reasons I am intrigued by public housing estates in the ex-communist countries.


– What is your favorite camera?
– I’m currently using a Sony A900 with a Minolta 16-35 zoom. I will soon have a Minolta 20mm.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I worked on the images for a book dedicated to the “La Certosa” historical ceemetery in Bologna. An exhibition is being prepared. I have also provided images for interior design magazines both in print and online.


-Thank you, Claudio. I wish you success with your photography.

14
Nov
11

julian escardo a.k.a. julian e… :: capturing Gehry’s forms


A selection of photos by Julian Escardo



Steel...

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Steel… (2010)

“Buildings, too, are children of Earth and Sun.” Frank Lloyd Wright



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Pas de cinq… (2009)

“There’s no secret to balance. You just have to feel the waves.” Frank Herbert



Heavy Metal....

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Heavy Metal…yearning for timelessness (2007)



Blaze...

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Blaze… (2008)



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During the… (2008)

“The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep.” Robert Frost



Follow through...

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Follow through… (2008)

“Paths are made by walking” Antonio Machado



Hint...

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Hint… (2007)



– Hello, Julian. How would you describe this photo selection?
– The set chosen captures my love for simple forms and flow. They can be viewed as finished pieces as well as incite the observer to go beyond.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Urban environments offer me the perfect playground to let my imagination run its course, and feed my passion for geometry and sensual lines.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– Besides architectural and urban photography I love abstracts and minimalism. They offer me the possibility to explore the relationship between painting and photography (very closely related as far as I am concerned) and explore basic lines, textures and push the limits and extract the very essence of a scene. I like to make the viewer think, dream and interpret a piece his or her own way.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– My motivation is the medium itself, the instant gratification and the thrill of capturing a scene as it happens. Sometimes a moment lasts a second or even less due to the available light, the positioning of an object in relation to other objects, or is influenced by the time of the year and so on. I also try and gain knowledge of a static piece (generally contemporary structures/buldings) and extrapolate the substance and frame that. I compose on site pending minor corrections afterward. I love to capture the heart of a piece and let the observer imagine the whole as from that “slice”. I often shoot well known structures, but present them in a way that the viewer has never seen them before forcing you to revisit what your eyes left behind. As far as goals I would like to get a commission one day, travel, design products for a company and of course do more showings…I can also work on finished pieces tailored to specific environments such as a home or office – there is nothing wrong with meeting a client half way and conforming to actual specifications; I can rise to that occasion with confidence.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I don’t have one but several dream locations; among them is the Music Center in Seattle (Frank Gehry), I would also love to tackle Calatrava in Spain, New York’s buldings in the early morning would be a feast for me and Dubai, where I always wanted to go and take on the explosion of glass and steel. I love the way they tackle scale there with no regard to expense whatsoever. For shadows and geometric abstracts New Mexico at 5 p.m.. Given one choice I would have to say Dubai, but I’d gladly settle for my beloved Paris.


– What is your favorite camera?
– I’m a Nikon guy: give me the D3X and set me loose please! I’d love to get hold of the new 10 mm lens and also carry the all around 24-70. I currently own a great D300 coupled with the 14-24 aspherical 2.8, tho I miss full frame view as I am very exacting when I go ‘click’.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I have made about four photo books, but I’m not ready to sell them yet. At the moment I show through Redbubble, it’s very convenient and I sell there too making it a one stop shop. Some of my photos were used for the American Institute of Architects’s (A.I.A.) video about Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall in L.A.. Besides Flickr I am also publishing on my blog, I am currently developing my own website.


– Thank you, Julian. All the best with your photography, I’m looking forward to see your website.

04
Nov
11

jacob schere :: geometrical urban wabi sabi


A selection of photos by Jacob Schere



Green Tiled International Reflection

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Green Tiled International Reflection


2Shirts, Squares and Rectangles

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2Shirts, Squares and Rectangles


The Sun Will Come Out at Night

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The Sun Will Come Out at Night


Fish Door Knob Window

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Fish Door Knob Window


From this Window, Peace on Earth

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From this Window, Peace on Earth


Rectangular Wabi Sabi, Shimbash 新橋

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Rectangular Wabi Sabi, Shimbash 新橋


Door Mailbox Window Squared

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Door Mailbox Window Squared



– Hi, Jacob. How would you describe this set of images?
– They are an exploration of Japanese daily elements in the form of shape, textures, and aging. I like to think about how these elements are interconnected and without them the urban world would be a boring place to inhabit. I like to find the simple beauty in the most everyday places.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– My lens eye sees in a square format. I like to see how all the geometry fits with in the square, and how does this square fit into its surroundings. A lot of the shitamachi (literally downtown, or old parts of town) have a lot of character. There was an enormous effort to rebuild Tokyo after WWII and the firebombing. Certain kinds of tiles, and corrugated metal were used as a means to build quick and cheaply. I am a sucker for the color tiles. The colors and hues just tell me the time that they were made. Another point with architecture is that humans create these places to be used. I am attracted to the buildings that show the presence of human’s touch, without having to see the humans.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– Recently, since I returned to Japan in the post earthquake and tsunami of March 11, my attention has turned to a subject that I never thought I would photograph – nature. For me nature, and especially, blossoms, became a sign of hope. Photographing nature was a way to escape the terrible shaking that we were having everyday in Japan. We were being reminded on a daily basis that the earth is alive and full of destructive power. I wanted to remind myself, and those that viewed my images, that there is an abundance of beauty in the natural world. I am trying to find a method that works those two opposing energies in the natural world.

I also do love doing somewhat straight documentary work. Especially, when I travel to Miami, Florida. I spend a lot of time with musicians and artists in the Hip Hop community because of my brother, hip hop educator and emcee, Brimstone127. I like to work around the people, and catch the liveliness of their vibrations without doing setups, or having them pose for the camera.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I have had a camera in my hand for so long I do not know what it is like NOT to have one. I do know this that through constant striving for perfection in my photography helps me to participate in the world. I want to share with others what I see in this world. Hopefully my worldview will find those out there that share similar or even opposing views. I hope that my images with encourage the viewers to engage in lucid communication.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? which city would you like to visit for a photo session? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– There are a few places. One is Jerusalem. I would love to spend an extended period of time photographing in that city and its surrounding areas. It would be returning to the source. Spending time in that city would benefit my soul as well as my photography.


– What is your favorite camera?
– That is easy, it was my Ricoh GRII digital camera, which I used for more than 3 years. Just about 2 weeks ago I got the Ricoh GRIV. It is compact camera with an amazing lens and can shoot square.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I run my own website and blog. I have committed myself to writing more about my work. I am currently rethinking how I approach the Lucid communication website and its focus will expand to include other photographers, reviews, and discussions on the state of photography. I want to share other photographers that inspire me like Brancolina and give the world a view of the amazing work that is out there.

lucidcommunication.com



– Thanks a lot, Jacob. All the best with your photography and the Lucid communication.