Archive for the 'monochrome urban photography' Category

23
Jun
13

avard woolaver :: from the series ‘Lee Friedlander Inspired’


A selection of photos by Avard Woolaver



everywhere signs

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everywhere signs



Quebec City, QC

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Quebec city, QC



Newport, NS

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Newport, NS



Hantsport, NS

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Hantsport, NS



Halifax, NS

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Halifax, NS



window view

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window view



– Hello Avard, how would you describe this set of images?

This set of images is titled “Lee Friedlander Inspired.” This is my take on some of his ideas and motifs–reflections, shadows, signs, cars, self-portraits. To me, his work conveys randomness, detachment, irony, and, most of all, a great sense of visual humour. He took elements usually regarded as obstacles and made them inherent and important parts of his images. So, in short, these images are my spin on Friedlander.
 
 
– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?

When I want to take a photo, it’s most often because of the light. I love to see the ways light reflects off walls or highlights various details of buildings and landscapes. I’m also interested in visual juxtapositions and the ways people interact with an urban environment.
 
 
– Do you have a dream location where you would like to take photos?

Japan. I lived there for six years a couple of decades ago, and I would love to go back to do some street photography. Japan is the most photo-friendly place I know; people there take pictures all the time, and they generally don’t mind at all if someone is walking around with a camera. It’s a completely different mindset about photography from that in many parts of the world.
 
 
– What is your favourite camera?

It’s a Rollei 35S. It’s great for street photography; I carried one for years and I’m very nostalgic about them. I don’t shoot film anymore, though. These days I like my Canon Rebel T3 and Canon 60D.
 
 
– Have you published a book, and where do you expose your work on the internet?

I post my photos on Ipernity, Flickr, Facebook and Twitter. I have not published a book; my work has appeared online in Excerpt Magazine, Aubade Magazine, Urban Photo Mag, Refractions Magazine, Andrew Sullivan’s blog The Dish, and Modismo. In print I’ve been featured in Camera Canada and various other North American publications.
 
 
– Thanks for the interview, I wish you all the best with your work.

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04
Feb
12

John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64 :: harmonics of space


A selection of photos by John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64


conversationwhitewallsq

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conversationwhitewallsq (2012)


treewallsq

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treewallsq (2007)


wharfropesq

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wharfropesq (2008)


dm4jcsq

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dm4jcsq (2008)


lineshadowsq

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lineshadowsq (2010)


multistoreysq

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multistoreysq (2007)



– Hello John. How would you describe this set of images?
– This is a very interesting selection of my photos. Firstly, all are film based, and all represent a moment in time, where there is alignment either by accident or observation (e.g. moving two steps to the left), all are about harmonics of space. I dislike the 35mm format of 3 to 2, it is not harmonic, neither are 5×4 or 10×8. I was strongly influenced early on by a book “Elements of dynamic symmetry” a Dover Publication, and later by a book on Islamic pattern by Keith Critchlow. These books and similar are not in the forefront of my mind whilst taking photographs, nor do I apply any rigid theory. However, working within a square and breaking elements down into harmonic proportions along with time and space is at the root of these photographs.

What is quite concerning to me is how difficult the transition has been from film to digital. I can remember going out with just 12 shots on 120 and the concentration that was needed to make intelligent decisions and to be able to walk away from what you knew was an average situation. I have long since dismantled my darkroom, it was the correct decision, but, oh my, this digital world is proving to be a challenge. There is no need to edit or walk away, this in turn can lead to sloppiness of thinking and the power of chance.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Architects do not make me smile, having said that things appear to be getting marginally better. Buildings are dormant, it is the moment of time, even the passing of time, the colour of the day, the movement of people and the alignment of things that are the observation. Photography is the need to recognise these things with others. We all see the same things, it is just that photographers have the need to store and record it.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I don’t know about styles, but I do have favourite photographers that I refer back to. I am also influenced by painters and often a very varied collection of them lurk around the back of my head whilst taking pics. There’s Rothko for sure, also Howard Hodgkin, Francis Bacon, Lucien Freud, Malevich, Kandinski, Nicholson … too many, even Annigoni. Photographers are referred to for their skills and technique as much as their insight, and their relationship with the time they each lived in. So Roger Fenton in the Crimea , Atget in France, Steichen, Moholy-Nagy, Brandt, the wit Lee Friedlander, Irving Penn, Salgado, even Snowdon having grown up with The Sunday Times colour supplement, and for sheer technique, Karsh and that 14inch Ektar. If this plants me with my head firmly looking back over my shoulder then so be it.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I take photographs every day. My goal is to have a full and rewarding day. Results are important, but only as an outcome of keeping my eyes open and trying not to respond in the same predictable ways, which is the thing I can be most guilty of. Thankfully I am beyond the screeching ego of youth and the pragmatism of middle age, I am now trying to find the courage to behave as fearlessly as Goya portrayed in his late manic etchings, I am that fearless or capable.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– Not a dream location as such, but I do have a dream to work with a writer or poet in the same way that Fay Godwin produced photographs for the book “Remains of Elmet” illustrating and reflecting the poetry of Ted Hughes, or explore the poetry of John Clare and the countryside of Northamptonshire where I live albeit two hundred years later.


– What is your favorite camera?
– My favourite camera was and still is the Rolleiflex. I like the viewfinder, the optics and the quietness of operation. I have owned two of them firstly a 3.5f with a planar lens and then a2.8f with planar as a replacement. This was a mistake , I should have kept both of them. Although the difference between 75mm and 80mm does not seem a great deal, in practice it proved enormous. The 75mm 3,5f Rollei was wonderful for landscape with an openness of vista that the 80mm 2.8f could not capture. On the other hand the 2,8f was the superior studio and portrait camera. My first camera was an Olympus OM1, I still have it but do not use it now and I would never want to part with it. Truth is my real passion is for lenses, especially English ones. I now have a Canon 5d mk2 and a Sony Nex5n, neither of which I feel much affection for, but they do the job of capturing the images made by my old lenses.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I have no books or other visibility on the internet other than Flickr. One cannot argue with the feedback from Flickr , it is what it is. It is high art, it is low art , it is multi- cultural and North South East and West . It is so broad that the thought “every one is out of step except me” is not a consideration.


-Thank you very much, it’s been a pleasure meeting you.

24
Nov
11

claudio alba a.k.a. simply1man :: urban visions


A selection of photos by Claudio Alba a.k.a. simply1man



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untitled


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untitled


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X_cross


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DSC03963


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QUARTIERE FIERISTIC


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il “Treno” (quartiere Barca) 1957-62 – Arch. Giuseppe Vaccaro


DSC02674 bw

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DSC02674 bw



– Hi, Claudio. How would you describe this set of images?
– I think this selection is highly representative of my approach to architectural photography: oblique camera angles and sequences of parallel planes. All highlighted by cuts of light and shadows.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– -I live in a city, Bologna, whose original medieval old town is a jewel of harmony. For my photographic work however, I am attracted to the outskirts of towns, which are chaotic and squalid. I love to seek and capture individual elements or perspectives that unveil an unobtrusive appearance or aestethic.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
-Photography of interiors: I am an interior designer and often use photography to document my work.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
-Like many amateur photographers who grew up on “chemical” photography, digital technology has rekindled a passion in me which was neglected due to a lack of time to devote in the darkroom. My intention is to turn my hobby into a business tied to to interior design publishing sector.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? which city would you like to visit for a photo session? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I particularly find Luis Barragan’s Mexican architectures very photogenic. For opposite reasons I am intrigued by public housing estates in the ex-communist countries.


– What is your favorite camera?
– I’m currently using a Sony A900 with a Minolta 16-35 zoom. I will soon have a Minolta 20mm.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I worked on the images for a book dedicated to the “La Certosa” historical ceemetery in Bologna. An exhibition is being prepared. I have also provided images for interior design magazines both in print and online.


-Thank you, Claudio. I wish you success with your photography.

03
Jun
11

fernandoprats :: immadencity


A selection of Fernando Prats’ photos from the series he made in Buenos Aires in April 2011. The photo-book ‘Immadencity, Buenos Aires contemporary architecture according to fernandoprats’ is going to be published in July in both standard and deluxe editions.

Original music: Hypnos by RV


fernandoprats_nothing like

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Nothing like


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An immadencity


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In April


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For rebirthing


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Under new


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Unexpected circumstances


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Like a drunk butterfly


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At the top of its possibilities



– Hello, Fernando. How would you describe this set of images?
Immadencity is a series of images about contemporary architecture in Buenos Aires, made by request of Red Square Gallery. As a footnote, I’d like to add that all of them were composed and framed during shooting in one day, with a handheld camera, a lens and natural light. Postproduction was conceived as a way of emphasizing the singular, dense and immanent character of the city through a notably corporeal iconography in the area of Puerto Madero, and it is limited to obeying the histogram’s wishes.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What attracts your visual attention?
– Perhaps the discourse of the shapes as a dialogue of power, the composition as a basis for positioning … On a more technical note, the handling of focus and depth of field as selection tools, geometry as a historical statement – although we’re getting less technical here … – spaces as erotic instruments, materials as a poetic weft, sensuality in the details …


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I like all styles because … (jump to the next question/answer)


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– … I am interested in risk, risk along with the command of tools, both in photography and in any other discipline. Imitating a determined style, whatever the reasons, swim in its surfaces and drink from its as hypothetical as austere springs, must not mean an inconvenient to anyone since it doesn’t even imply any challenge: it’s only about assuming gestures as one’s own. But … the ephemeral and the lack of substance and possible cor/relates show under the auspices of diverse forms, tics that come and go, happily and inexorably towards their fatal, as Jean would say, and irreductible fate, as Oliverio would delimit. The proliferation of non-places 2.0 somehow provides and favours a sort of convex mirror determined to bring back, excuse my words, a priori clichés and, if participants insist, pictures that are blurred, textured, reframed, hyperfiltered, reflected and/or etcetera a posteriori. Maybe that’s the reason why I prefer to think of images more than photographs, or even better fotoworks, neologism that unites under the umbrella of an idea, titles, small texts, tags and links that de-re-signify and question the semantic unicity of a certain image or group of pixels.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– Not a ‘dream’ one, neither a single one. I keep going. Slowly but surely, although sometimes a bit of a rush is OK too. Right now I’d like to go to Mexico and Australia in 2012.


– What is your favorite camera?
– Most of the time I use a Nikon D7000, a Canon 40D and a Casio EX-H10. Some others that have brought me satisfactions, but I have decided to hibernate a FujiFilm S5800, a Nikon S550, and several lomo cameras (Holga 120s, Woca 120, Supersampler, Colorsplash, Actionsampler, Pop9). Currently, my favoutire lenses are Tokina 11-16 f/2.8, Sigma 30mm f/1.4, Nikon 50mm f/1.8, Tamron 90mm f/2.8, Canon 70-200 f/2.8 L and Tamron’s 50th Anniversary commemorative 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– Yes, some published examples are “Whe(re)n?”, “Shapes and Shapes” (Formas y formas XL), “Formas y formas” and in collaboration with Miguel Ruibal “Objetos Sujetos”. Also collective publications such as “Shadé” and “Shadé II” by Brancolina, Hypo-X-Series, a digital curation by Alan Wilson, White as a colour (for the fight against multiple sclerosis) by Sophie Addison and 1 Navidad, 1 niño, un libro by Escritores Solidarios.

As for online circulation, and leaving aside YSE for obvious reasons, some photographic works were published in magazines such as FILE magazine, U.K.’s Building magazine, And I still miss you or Platform 58, and have been exhibited in Tate Liverpool online, Open Call – Frieze Art Fair 2009, Ambiguities exhibition @ University of Kent, ElPAÍS.com, ****contrasted gallery and on Azurebumble’s blog Aesthetic investigations.

On my day to day, and as a part of what could be called a methodological routine, I publish my work in several social networks, with my main axis on Facebook and Flickr.

More info at fernandoprats.com

– Thank you, Fernando for giving me an opportunity to present a selection of your previously unpublished works and for answering an interview. I wish you all the best with your work!

English version translated by Alicia Pallas, to read in Spanish please click here

03
May
11

rita vita finzi :: catching the rhythm with a camera


Selection of photos from Rita Vita Finzi


am spree

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Am Spree


little wings

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Little wings


The lamp

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The lamp


a walk on the roof

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A walk on the roof


A man

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A man


•

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– Hello, Rita. How would you describe this set of images?
– I am smiling looking at your selection, because the most of the pics you have chosen have been taken in Berlin, that is not only a city I love so much, but also one of my favorite location – so, thank you. Only Lamps is ‘Italian’, due to the courtesy of a friend of mine, who was driving and kindly stopped the car hearing me crying ‘stop-stop-stop, please!’ (!!!):). I think composition, contrasts, monochrome graphic effect is what keep them together.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and Architecture? What attracts your visual attention?
– “Architecture is music in space” – well, I think this F.W.J.von Schelling’s quote can represent what I feel for architecture and the reason why I love it. Therefore, I am trying to “catch” this music – details, play of lines and surfaces, reflections, rhythm, repetitions, this is what attracts my visual attention. And, above all: the light!


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I love many subjects, but nature is one of my favorite, in particular flowers and leaves: play of colours and shapes, tiny details and even that kind of exquisite “design” (yes, you can find a sort of very different “architecture” there). More than this: sea.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I consider my camera a kind of “brush” that allows me to “paint” what I see all around me, and sometimes what I feel. This gives me a lot, and motivate me. My goals? To improve, of course – not just in a technical way (even if I should have still so much to learn), but more in terms of creativity and inspiration.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’ where you would like to take photos? Which city would you like to visit for a photo session?
– I wouldn’t talk about a city, but about architects: Calatrava and Gehry, wherever they are!


– What is your favorite camera?
– I have started by chance with a Canon and I find it excellent. At the moment I’m working with a Canon 40D, but I’m dreaming about the EOS 5D Mark II.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– Yes, I do. I have published a few books on Blurb: Natural/mente (June 2008), La Memoria del Segno (September 2008) in collaboration with Susanna Bassani, Alberta Dionisi, Claudio Mori and Stefano Sivieri, Abstractions ( November 2008), And that is poetry (January 2010), Berlin (January 2010) and the latest one Peonies Pavillon, that is published in April 2011. On the internet you can find my photographs on Flickr and RedBubble. I also have a channel on YouTube, where I have uploaded 3 video-slideshows with my works.

-Thank you, Rita. I wish you all the best with your photographic work.

note from 20 July 2011: Rita’s website is ritavitafinzi.com