Archive for February, 2012

24
Feb
12

wilma eras a.k.a. w.eras :: urban scenes painted by shadows


A selection of photos by Wilma Eras a.k.a. w.eras



Light in the city 4

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Light in the city 4 (2011)



Lightscape 9

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Lightscape 9 (2011)



Corner 1

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Corner 1 (2010)



Concrete beauty 1

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Concrete beauty 1 (2011)



Urban reflections 5

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Urban reflections 5 (2011)



Squares

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Squares (2011)



Acrobat

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Acrobat (2011)



– Hello, Wilma. Welcome to the gallery. How would you describe this set of images?
– They are all about light. In the first four images I used light to reveal the beauty of concrete surfaces. The windows series shows another aspect of light: the power to connect the interior to the exterior world. As for the last one, I simply loved to see the acrobat.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Urban environments offer me the possibility to explore my own sense of space. In doing so, light always triggers me. A Flickr friend once called me a sunflower. I think he is right. I’m fascinated by the way light is able to change the geometry of a certain space, which looks different one minute to the next, offering new geometric shapes all over again.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I love to make ‘paperstracts’. When I look through my macro lens, a new world opens for me. It’s exciting to discover landscapes or human shapes in a piece of paper.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– My photography reflects the way I experience the urban environment around me. I do not have a very good sense of orientation. I tend to see details rather than the complete street map of a city, which can be tricky because time changes most details. Besides that, the more I investigate a certain place, the more I have the feeling to look at what is beyond it. That is also the reality that I want to share.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– I guess I could work everywhere, but it’s always nice to explore new spaces. For instance, I would really like to visit the MAXXI in Rome.


– What is you favourite camera?
– I mostly work with a Nikon D90. Recently I also got a nice compact Lumix camera.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– Besides Flickr, I have published some works in Y SIN EMBARGO magazine by Fernando Prats (click here to find links to all issues where I contributed) and in collective photo books Haphazart!2, Shadé and Shadé II. Selections of my photos are presented on Azurebumble’s weblog Aesthetic Investigations in posts Wilma Eras: paperstracts and Wilma Eras: photography. I have recently published the photo book Fragments in collaboration with mengwen29 (Françoise Lucas), to preview click here.


– Thanks, Wilma. Best wishes for your photography and congratulations on the photo book.

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14
Feb
12

crosslens :: urban minimalism


A selection of photos by crosslens



red concrete example

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red concrete example (2011)


waiting zone

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waiting zone (2009)


room with view

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room with view (2010)


displacement

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displacement (2009)


castle lines

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castle lines (2011)


emergency  exit

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emergency exit (2010)


toilet paper alarm

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toilet paper alarm (2011)



– Hello Ralf. How would you describe this set of images?
– My first intention was: oh, a lot of red squares and rectangles – Red square gallery, the name says it all. On the second view I made an interesting discovery: when I made these photos it was not the red that attracted my attention but the play of the lines, the space and the dots in these photos. The red was an add-on that caused the balance weight of the composition. With another color I’m sure I would have composed and balanced some of these photos in another way. It’s a feeling that I cannot describe with rules: when I see a motif and I want to convey it in the 2:3-Format of my camera I try to find a balance that is formed by structures and colors. Each of these elements has his own weight that will balance the scale.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– I think my urban environments and architecture are often stringently geometric. I love the precise and straight lines and the (a)symmetry of modern architecture– and the break of these lines and (a)symmetry. It reminds me an excursion to a city in Germany that is famous for its old buildings from the 14th century. I entered the inner city, saw all these old buckled and crooked buildings and my first question was: and where is here the quarter with modern architecture?

What attracts my attention? Lines, lines and lines – and the interaction of these lines that can make geometric structures. Light, light and light – and the interaction of the light that makes shadows and colors.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I love modern architecture, but I also love the nature and sometimes I spend weeks in the middle of nowhere surrounded by woods, lakes and grassland. I take hundreds of photos just from the trees, the light on the trees, between the trees, from the landscapes and the clouds, the plants and the meadows.
In the city I find my nature in the botanical garden where I can pass hours lying on the floor and making macro photos of colorful plants. I replace the strict large geometry of the architecture with the liberty of forms of small flowers. Not to forget: I love minimalism, the reduction of things to nearly nothing.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– The beginning was a great mistake: I’m a programmer and I wanted to leave the monitor and to go out. But digital photography calls for coming back to “develop” these photos – and I’ve to pass again a good dose of time in front of a Monitor. I try to find and to photograph the nature of the things, the nature of my motif. I want to achieve that the beholder finds out that beauty can be everywhere, in the small as in the large, in the things made by humans as in the things made by the nature. Sometimes it depends just on the point of view.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– There are surely some places where the concentration of structures that I like is very, very high. But as a binge can have enough painful side-effects I prefer to discover a location for a long time. As I learned here in Hamburg that I can still discover new motifs, the dream location is where I am in the moment I’m making the photo.


– What is your favorite camera?
– The camera that I’m able to adjust. It’s not the camera which makes the photo – it’s the photographer. I know what I want to catch how and I just need a camera that can do that and the knowledge how I can do that with this camera. But I’ve some favorite lenses: my macro and my wide angle.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I’ve never published any photo books, I’m too lazy. It would mean that I’ve to pass again more time in front of a monitor after my work and the developing of my photos. I’ve my own photo-website that I didn’t update since years and I’m the webmaster of a photo group where some of my photos are posted. Flickr that is like my diary for photography. It’s quick an easy. But I’ve to say that I’m not a “good” community member – because it would cause that I pass again more time in front of a computer.


– Thank you very much, Ralf.

04
Feb
12

John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64 :: harmonics of space


A selection of photos by John Whitham a.k.a. voigtf64


conversationwhitewallsq

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conversationwhitewallsq (2012)


treewallsq

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treewallsq (2007)


wharfropesq

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wharfropesq (2008)


dm4jcsq

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dm4jcsq (2008)


lineshadowsq

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lineshadowsq (2010)


multistoreysq

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multistoreysq (2007)



– Hello John. How would you describe this set of images?
– This is a very interesting selection of my photos. Firstly, all are film based, and all represent a moment in time, where there is alignment either by accident or observation (e.g. moving two steps to the left), all are about harmonics of space. I dislike the 35mm format of 3 to 2, it is not harmonic, neither are 5×4 or 10×8. I was strongly influenced early on by a book “Elements of dynamic symmetry” a Dover Publication, and later by a book on Islamic pattern by Keith Critchlow. These books and similar are not in the forefront of my mind whilst taking photographs, nor do I apply any rigid theory. However, working within a square and breaking elements down into harmonic proportions along with time and space is at the root of these photographs.

What is quite concerning to me is how difficult the transition has been from film to digital. I can remember going out with just 12 shots on 120 and the concentration that was needed to make intelligent decisions and to be able to walk away from what you knew was an average situation. I have long since dismantled my darkroom, it was the correct decision, but, oh my, this digital world is proving to be a challenge. There is no need to edit or walk away, this in turn can lead to sloppiness of thinking and the power of chance.


– As a photographer, what do you find interesting about urban environments and architecture? What usually attracts your visual attention?
– Architects do not make me smile, having said that things appear to be getting marginally better. Buildings are dormant, it is the moment of time, even the passing of time, the colour of the day, the movement of people and the alignment of things that are the observation. Photography is the need to recognise these things with others. We all see the same things, it is just that photographers have the need to store and record it.


– Which other photographic styles do you like besides architectural and urban photography?
– I don’t know about styles, but I do have favourite photographers that I refer back to. I am also influenced by painters and often a very varied collection of them lurk around the back of my head whilst taking pics. There’s Rothko for sure, also Howard Hodgkin, Francis Bacon, Lucien Freud, Malevich, Kandinski, Nicholson … too many, even Annigoni. Photographers are referred to for their skills and technique as much as their insight, and their relationship with the time they each lived in. So Roger Fenton in the Crimea , Atget in France, Steichen, Moholy-Nagy, Brandt, the wit Lee Friedlander, Irving Penn, Salgado, even Snowdon having grown up with The Sunday Times colour supplement, and for sheer technique, Karsh and that 14inch Ektar. If this plants me with my head firmly looking back over my shoulder then so be it.


– What motivates you to be busy with photography, what is your goal as a photographer?
– I take photographs every day. My goal is to have a full and rewarding day. Results are important, but only as an outcome of keeping my eyes open and trying not to respond in the same predictable ways, which is the thing I can be most guilty of. Thankfully I am beyond the screeching ego of youth and the pragmatism of middle age, I am now trying to find the courage to behave as fearlessly as Goya portrayed in his late manic etchings, I am that fearless or capable.


– Do you have a ‘dream location’, where would you like to take photos?
– Not a dream location as such, but I do have a dream to work with a writer or poet in the same way that Fay Godwin produced photographs for the book “Remains of Elmet” illustrating and reflecting the poetry of Ted Hughes, or explore the poetry of John Clare and the countryside of Northamptonshire where I live albeit two hundred years later.


– What is your favorite camera?
– My favourite camera was and still is the Rolleiflex. I like the viewfinder, the optics and the quietness of operation. I have owned two of them firstly a 3.5f with a planar lens and then a2.8f with planar as a replacement. This was a mistake , I should have kept both of them. Although the difference between 75mm and 80mm does not seem a great deal, in practice it proved enormous. The 75mm 3,5f Rollei was wonderful for landscape with an openness of vista that the 80mm 2.8f could not capture. On the other hand the 2,8f was the superior studio and portrait camera. My first camera was an Olympus OM1, I still have it but do not use it now and I would never want to part with it. Truth is my real passion is for lenses, especially English ones. I now have a Canon 5d mk2 and a Sony Nex5n, neither of which I feel much affection for, but they do the job of capturing the images made by my old lenses.


– Did you publish any photo books and where do you expose your works on internet?
– I have no books or other visibility on the internet other than Flickr. One cannot argue with the feedback from Flickr , it is what it is. It is high art, it is low art , it is multi- cultural and North South East and West . It is so broad that the thought “every one is out of step except me” is not a consideration.


-Thank you very much, it’s been a pleasure meeting you.